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HARRIS, M.D. Reverend *John

Male 1725 - Bef 1790


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  • Name  HARRIS, M.D. Reverend *John 
    Title  Reverend 
    Born  29 Sep 1725  Hopewell Township, Salem, New Jersey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    _UID  9848F3CF5462D5119887CB8894AA793FA6F0 
    Died  Bef 5 Apr 1790  Abbeville District, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I61  Ancestors of Catherine Yvonne King | The Ancestors and Descendants of Johan Jakob Brown/Braun the "Waggonmaker".
    Last Modified  13 Jul 2006 

    Father  HARRIS Wm. Nathaniel (? ),   b. 8 Oct 1693, Connecticut or Long Island, possibly at East Hampton Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 2 Nov 1775, Hopewell Township, Cumberland Co., New Jersey Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  UNKNOWN Elizabeth,   b. Abt 1697, Ewing Farm, Jerome Township, Union, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  1722 
    Family ID  F761  Group Sheet

    Family  HANDY *Mary Dashiell,   b. 8 Nov 1733, Salisbury, Somerset Co., MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Jul 1801, Anderson Co., SC Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  Abt 1758  Somerset County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. HARRIS Handy,   b. 7 Jan 1760, Worcester Co., Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location
    >2. HARRIS John II,   b. 6 Dec 1762, Snow Hill, Eastern Shore, MD Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Apr 1845, Anderson County, South Carolina Find all individuals with events at this location
    >3. HARRIS *Anne Handy,   b. 1764/1765, Snow Hill, Eastern Shore, MD Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 27 Jun 1831, Lincoln County, Tennessee Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. HARRIS Thomas,   b. 11 May 1768, Snow Hill, Worcester Co, MD Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. HARRIS Elizabeth Gillis,   b. 1769, Snow Hill, Eastern Shore, MD Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. HARRIS Nathaniel,   b. Aft 1769, Snow Hill, Eastern Shore, MD Find all individuals with events at this location
    Family ID  F27  Group Sheet

  • Documents
    Six Patiots of the American Revolution
    Six Patiots of the American Revolution
    Six Patriots of the American Revolution and One
    Probable Loyalist with Descendants in Jackson and
    DeKalb Counties, Alabama
    NSDAR#631571 by Frances Lyles Gay Varnell ( 1986)

  • Notes 
    • SOURCE NOTES:

      The Reverend John Harris was a Presbyterian minister and a Revolutionary War Patriot. He served in the
      Second Provincial Congress for the Ninety-sixth District which became Abbeville District, South Carolina.
      NOTE: From Kay Hines ( Suzalee @ aol.com)
      I still believe that Reverend John was the son of Nathaniel Harris. I haven't been able to track down the
      original source for Reverend John's birthdate. If we can get that, I think we can absolutely say that he's
      Nathaniels son. I believe I told you that the Nathaniel Harris Bible has a son named John listed with the
      birthdate September 29, 1725, the same that we have for our Reverend John.

      SOURCE NOTES:
      Lessley & Clark Families ( Betty Jo Ellis )

      Reverend John Harris was born September 29, 1725 in Hopewell Township, Salem, NJ., the son of
      Nathaniel Harris and Elizabeth___?__ ( see letter from Kay Hines, dated July 17, 2001 ). There are
      conflicting reports as to the place of his birth, some reports say that he was born in Maryland, but this
      is possibly because his wife was from Maryland and he lived in Maryland before moving to South Carolina. He earned an AB degree at Nassau Hall ( now Princeton University ) in 1753. He served as a
      Presbyterian Minister to several churches in Delaware, Virginia and Maryland. While in Maryland, he met
      and married Mary Dashiell Handy, the daught of Colonel Isaac Handy and Ann Dashiell of Somerset
      County, Maryland. He also served in the Second Provincial Congress for the Ninety-Six District, which
      became Abbeville District, South Carolina. Reverend John Harris was a Revolutionary War Patriot.
      During the Revolutionary War, Reverend Harris and his family were targeted by the Tories because of his influential position and his championing of the American cause. Nathaniel, the youngest son of the family was ill at their home when it was invaded by the Tories. They took all the family's valuables and stripped Nathaniel of his clothing, leaving him to die in his youth. ( See page 50, ANNALS AND MEMORIALS OF THE HANDYS AND THEIR KINDRED, by Isaac W.K. Handy, D.D. ) The family's two
      oldest sons, John II and Handy, served in the Revolutionary War. John II served under General
      Andrew Pickens and eventually married his daughter, Mary Pickens. In person, Reverend John was
      not above medium stature, but his sturdy frame and erect carriage commanded respect and the severe but honest determination of his countenance tempered the pleasanteis which often sparkled from his dark eyes. But having ( to use his own words ) a hesitancy in his speech, his delivery was not of the popular kind, yet his solid sense and convincing argument gave him influence in the pulpit and in judicatories of the church. In his missionary labors he was zealous, indefatigable and ready to dispense the word whenever practicable under a spreading tree or in the log cabin and he had a word
      of encouragement and rebuke for all. An aged lady, born in 1769 remembered hearing him preach under a large chestnut tree near the residence of General Pickens, which was then the " Block House", on the site now occupied by Abbeville Village. As early as 1773, he had formed a settlement in the
      " Flat Woods ", on the waters of McKinley's Creek and the Little River. As a land owner and planter, he bore no small share of the losses and suffering inflicted by the Indians and the Tories. At one time nearly all of his slaves were driven off to Florida, where the British had established a depot for them.
      Reverend Harris often preached with his gun in the pulpit beside him and his ammunition suspended from his neck, after the fashion of the old times. Although very genial and tolerant, he was uncomprimising champion of the faith. It was even thought that he would not hesitate to demonstrate the belief by physical as well as rational arguments. At the close of the War, he was the only Presbyterian minister in what was afterwards known as the Abbeville District.

      SOURCE: History of the Presbyterian Church in South Carolina, by George Howe, DD 1870.

      In 1772 Reverend Harris was sent by the Orange Presbytery to Ninety Six District of South Carolina to establish Presbyterian churches. At the Greenvale Church near Hodges, South Carolina there is a monument to the Reverend John Harris. This tablet was presented to the church by the pastor, in memory of the first settled minister of the congregation. It is a square monument of blue marble and contains as emblems, two continental flags with the following inscription in while letters.

      " Sacred to the memory of the Reverend John Harris, M.D. First pastor of this church in 1773. A patriot of the American Revolution. "
    • DAR Application # 631571 by Frances Lyles Gay Varnell @ 1986
      Six Patriots of the American Revolution and One Probable Loyalist with Descendants in Jackson and DeKalb Counties, Alabama.