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ENGLEMAN Florence May

Female 1879 - 1964


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  • Name  ENGLEMAN Florence May 
    Born  25 Oct 1879  Spencer Township, Harrison Co., Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender  Female 
    _UID  9EE12DF75B1DEB44AEC5E933EE56342273B1 
    Died  21 Mar 1964  Georgetown, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried  Wolfe Cemetery, Georgetown, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I3620  Ancestors of Catherine Yvonne King | The Ancestors of Catherine King from the Virginia King Family of Stafford and Louisa County, Virginia
    Last Modified  24 Jun 2004 

    Father  ENGLEMAN George Washington 
    Mother  FAWVER Lydia Jane 
    Family ID  F1281  Group Sheet

    Family  KING William Rivers,   b. 31 Dec 1871, Bradford, Harrison County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Jul 1950, Georgetown, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  25 Oct 1899  Spencer Township, Harrison Co., Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location  [2
    Children 
    >1. KING Marshall Earl,   b. 25 Mar 1901, Harrison County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Sep 1980, Scott County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location
    >2. KING George William,   b. 23 Feb 1903, Harrison County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 21 Aug 2001, Clark County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location
    >3. KING Clifford Henry,   b. 26 Sep 1905, Harrison County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Sep 1989, Floyd County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. KING Wayne Edward,   b. 27 Mar 1908, Harrison County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 May 1998, Harrison County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location
    >5. KING Glenn Leslie,   b. 11 Oct 1911, Harrison County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 23 May 1999, Floyd County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. KING Philip Peter,   b. Apr 1913, Harrison County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Apr 1913, Harrison County, Indiana Find all individuals with events at this location
    >7. KING Z.M.
    Family ID  F1226  Group Sheet

  • Notes 
    • From Betty King McCoskey: recieved on the 22 June 2004

      The following was wrote by my Grandmother Florence King around 1920. Mrs. William R. King of Georgetown, Indiana.
      Early Beginnings on the Farm
      How we paid for the Farm

      In the fall of 1899 my husband bought on my approval, 65 acres limestone upland. It had been rented for years and was run down in every way. Fences were all gone except for just enough wire to mark the outside lines of the farm. The buildings were all torn down and burned for fuel by the tenants, except for a log hen house that was ready to fall and a two-room dwelling that had never known paint or paper in its three score years. There were three good springs suitably located to furnish water for stock on any part of the farm. A good small cistern near the house. About three acres of fruit of various kinds and an ideal location for new buildings, should we ever be able to place them.

      We moved to this farm in November, 1899. Our wordly possessions were one good grade Jersey cow and heifer, one old black cow, two dozen hens, a top buggy and harness, sufficient household and kitchen furniture for two rooms. Meat, lard,
      preserves and canned fruit enough to last us till the next season, $ 200.00 in cash and a $ 600.00 mortgage on the farm.

      Our encouragement's from friends and curious people were few, most of them were discouragement's, but we were young with hearts filled with hope and we were determined to make good. The first thing my husband did was make a straw shed to shelter our stock. There was a large straw stack on the farm and by using poles and forks cut from the woods nearby he succeeded in making a large room, which sheltered our cows and the two horses we bought before spring.

      The next thing he did was dig a cellar under one room of the house. He blasted out and dressed rock to wall up the cellar. As fine ledges of rock were found on the bluff of the creek which formed the boundary on the north side of the farm. During the winter and early spring when he was not working for the neighbors for seventy-five cents a day, he put in every workable day in cleaning up the farm and cutting timber for lumber for a new barn, riving out oak boards to cover the same. A few trees were exchanged for a farm wagon and some farm implements, all second hand. The $200.00 was invested in other used implements, a yearling heifer and the team and harness. We had completed the barn and occupied the same by December 1900, our heard by that time was somewhat increased by young cattle but the old cow had died, and the old plug horse gave out and was sold for $ 2.00 to the fertilizer company. A dear lesson, but one which was worth more to us during the years to follow, then most lessons are. We never again bought old stock of any kind.

      About this time we engaged our butter, eggs and produce to private customers in the city twelve miles away. We delivered it every Tuesday rain or shine. A good three year old mare was bought in February 1901 ( and is with us yet, doing good work on the farm )a good Jersey heifer was added to our herd. A brood sow was purchased and some needed fencing was put up. This gives a pen picture of our start and struggles on farming. Needless to say we could not pay the interest the first year after having so much loss and building a 30 x 30 ft. barn with shed stables at either end although my husband did all the carpenter work with the exception of putting up the frame.

      The next year we succeeded in paying the interest on the $ 600 mortgage for the 1st and 2nd year, built a kitchen and smokehouse and installed a cream seperator, hand powered ( which is giving satisfactory service yet ). Our live stock increased by the addition of a nice colt, 3 Jersey heifers and 3 pigs. Our private trade in the city increased and satisfied customers clamored for all the butter, eggs, cheese, buttermilk, sweet milk, poultry and farm produce we could take to them, once a week. It began to look like by hard work and close living we would not have to give up the farm as our friends advised us to do. But we were discouraged by having to pay out all the money we had after paying taxes and interest, for feed for our cattle, so when we had a chance in 1903 to buy 80 acres at a moderate price, within distance of half a mile from our home we bought it, although we had to give a mortgage on both farms to do so. This was a big leap, but we had talked it over and decided it was the only way open to us to better our condition.

      The new farm had some fencing and could be pastured, as there was running water in the pasture and an old but good bank barn where cattle could find shelter in the time of storms. There was an old house too. There was 8 acres of overflowed creek bottomland for corn and considerable grass. We had enough fee for our stock the following year and sold 20 tons of hay besides. From that time on we could make payments on our land. In 1907 we built an eight room
      house on the 65 acre farm. Our progress up till this time had been all that we ever expected it could be. The farm upland was improved by cutting off all brush and brier land and sowing blue grass. At this time we were milking seven good cows and had a nice herd of young cattle, all manure was saved and used as top dressing on the wheat, clover and grass

      In 1910 we added 50 acres of upland that was by the 65-acre farm, this increased our pastureland for our dairy herd and gave us 222 good fields for wheat and hay and 3-acres of orchards containing all kinds of fruit. About this time we bought a new surrey and harness and some new farm machinery. In 1912, we bought a 4-horsepower gasoline engine to use to furnish power for a cutoff saw, washing machine, etc. It proved to be the greatest labor and time saver we have. In 1912 we also bought 80 acres of good land that was by the first 80 acres we had bought. A creek was the line between the two 80 acres. This new farm had a new 5-room dwelling, new bard 50 x 40 and all necessary out buildings. There was 30 acres overflowed creek bottom land, 30 acres new blue grass land and the remainder was timber and table land. This proved to be our best investment although we had little cash on hand and again placed a mortgage on all lands possessed.

      The former mortgages had proved a friend and not a boogie-boo and we were not afraid to give another one. In three years from the date of purchase of the last farm we were able to wipe out all debts and breathe freely again. Our home was comfortable furnished including a piano for music. We bought an automobile and built a silo. Our farm is well stocked with Jersey cattle, sheep, hogs, horses and poultry of all kinds. We now sell cream instead of market it. We are proud of our 275-acre farm and all of our stock, but the pride and joy that surmounts all is the fine children God gave us. Five boys, the oldest 18 years old and a flower of a baby daughter now 16 months old.

      We our beloved US was at war and a call was made for everyone to help, by conserving, and buying bonds and stamps. We all joined hands from dad to the baby and gave our support in all ways to Uncle Sam. We don't mean to build that modern barn that has been our dream for the last 3 years, until the government does not need our help. However , we did hold our footing and progress by living within our means when we took in little money we spent less, nevery buying anything we ded not need because it was a bargain. Never going in debt to live, by looking after our stock carefully and thereby preventing serious losses. By raising a good garden every year and canning surplus vegetables and fruit not marketable. By raising all the poultry each year we could care for thereby having young fryers to sell and eat , also fresh eggs. By buying young stock that was offered for sale reasonable and selling matured horses and fresh cows, by feeding all grains on the farm by Husband and Wife and Children pulling together.

      F.M.K.

  • Sources 
    1. [S61] Betty King McCoskey Genealogy, Betty King McCoskey, 22 Jun 2004.

    2. [S61] Betty King McCoskey Genealogy, Betty King McCoskey.