Our Family Genealogy Pages

Home Page  |  What's New  |  Photos  |  Histories  |  Headstones  |  Reports  |  Surnames


First/Given Name(s):


Last/Surname:



MCCURDY(MACURDY) *Petheric

Male 1640 -


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name  MCCURDY(MACURDY) *Petheric 
    Born  1640  Isle of Bute, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    _UID  E1C7A178F990E74FA2B69D17924FBC4B746B 
    Person ID  I2566  Ancestors of Catherine Yvonne King | The Ancestors and Descendants of Johan Jakob Brown/Braun the "Waggonmaker".
    Last Modified  7 Mar 2004 

    Father  MCCURDY(MACURDY) *Daniel,   b. 1622, Isle of Bute, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Mother  UNKNOWN Elizabeth,   b. 1622, Isle of Bute, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  Abt 1639  Isle of Bute, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID  F877  Group Sheet

    Family  STEWART *Margaret,   b. 1644, Ballintoy, County Antrim, North Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef 1747, Cavan, Country Antrim, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  Bef 1668  County Antrim, North Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. MCCURDY(MACURDY) Rachel
    >2. MCCURDY(MACURDY) *James,   b. 1668, Ballintoy, County Antrim, North Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Bef. 1768, Cavan, County Antrim, Ireland Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. MCCURDY(MACURDY) David,   b. Abt 1670
     4. MCCURDY(MACURDY) William,   b. Abt 1673
     5. MCCURDY(MACURDY) John,   b. Abt 1675
     6. MCCURDY(MACURDY) Daniel,   b. Abt 1677
    Family ID  F876  Group Sheet

  • Notes 
    • SOURCE NOTES:

      Alias: " The Refugee"
      Bute, an island in the firth of Clyde is about 12 miles long from north to south and averages five miles
      in breadth. The northern part is mountainous, but yields an abundance of good pasture. It is noted
      for the large amount of goats and cattle that abound there. One of the greatest industries, which has been carried on for centuries is cheese making. The air is healthy and the people are noted for their great
      ages. Rothsay is the chief town. Near this place is an ancient castle, which was once a royal palace, which gave title to the heir apparent of the Crown of Scotland, long before the union between Scotland
      and England. Before this time, and a a very early period, Bute belonged to the ancient McKirdy tribes and
      they were the sole possessors, and Lords of the Isles. For a long time, Bute, with the rest of the Western Lands, was under the Crown of Sweden, but ruled by the Lords of the Isles. Near the middle of the 17th Century, when religious persecutors prevailed throughout Scotland, the inhabitants of Bute, ( Presbyterians ) suffered from the English sectarians ( who had made in-roads, and settlements in the Island ) to such an extent that many were driven from their native island, while others sought refuge in the mountain hamlets. At last the Presbyterians arose in arms, but all were against them; they were undisciplined in the art of warfare, and they royal army so much more powerful, that those who failed to make their escape were massacred without regard to age or sex. It is supposed, and no doubt true, that the large McKirdy race became extinct, by these massacres, with the exception of Pethric McKirdy
      ( afterwards spelled McCurdy ) and his four brothers, David, John, Williams and Daniel. These brothers
      escaped in an open boat, and through a blinding snowstorm from Bute, in the latter part of November 1666, they sailed across the turbulent sea and landed on one of the rocky islands near the north coast of Ireland. It is claimed that they took refuge in this island and for two days and nights, tasted no food. On the morning of the third day, they sailed a short distance and landed near " Giant's Causeway", County Antrim, Ireland where they were recieved by the Presbyterians who had settled there from Scotland some years previous; but here too, they were persecuted by the Irish Catholics. In 1690, the McCurdys were amoung the first to take up arms to defend their religion. When William of Orange landed his army in Ireland, he was greatly reinforced by the uprising of the Presbyterians. Shortly afterwards, the great battle of Boyne was fought, which proved the complete downfall of James II and ended the reigning power of the Catholic line of the house of Stuart. At what time Petheric married Margaret is uncertain; yet they must have married shortly after reaching Ireland, as their grandson,
      David McCurdy was born in 1709. Petheric died near the close of the 17th Century.